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13.0 Graduate Admission & Programs 2016/2017

13.0.1 Educational Objectives

The central education objective of Concordia University of Edmonton is consistent with its mission: to be recognized nationally and internationally for its graduates’ knowledge, skill, integrity, and wisdom.
This objective is the foundation for the Faculty’s more specific objectives:

  1. To provide students with advanced instruction in a specialized field of study.
  2. To require students to become thoroughly conversant with the major scholarly and/or professional contributions to their field.
  3. To develop in students the ability to conduct advanced research.
  4. To enable students to work both independently and cooperatively with their peers and with professionals in their field.
  5. To educate students in the effective oral and written communication of their research results.
  6. To foster in students the highest ethical and professional standards.

13.0.2 Graduate Degree Areas of Responsibility

A. Graduate Students

Graduate students are ultimately responsible for their own programs. They are expected to read the Calendar and any other relevant documents to become familiar with all regulations and deadlines relating to their programs. The students’ fundamental responsibilities include ensuring that their registration is accurate and does not lapse, submitting appropriate forms to the Faculty of Graduate Studies office for signature and processing, and paying all fees required by the deadline dates set out in the Calendar.
Graduate students should do the following:

  • make themselves aware of the contents of the graduate portions of the Calendar and take responsibility for their own program requirements as specified in the Calendar;
  • maintain open communication with their supervisor and MPC Chair concerning any problem either real or perceived;
  • inform the supervisor regularly about progress;
  • make research results accessible to an appropriate audience;
  • be aware of deadlines for possible scholarship applications, and seek advice and assistance from the MPC Chair in making applications.

B. Supervisors

Graduate students will normally pursue their program of study and complete a thesis under a single supervisor. But it is also possible for a student to work under co-supervisors, who would agree to share the supervisory duties and responsibilities.

The supervisor is directly responsible for the supervision of the student’s program. In this capacity, the supervisor assists the student in planning a program, ensures that the student is aware of all program requirements, degree regulations, and general regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, provides counsel on all aspects of the program, and stays informed about the student’s research activities and progress. The supervisor also ensures that students conduct their research in a manner that is as effective, safe, and productive as possible. The supervisor prepares a program of studies for the student and attends the candidate’s examinations, ensuring that these are scheduled and held in accordance with regulations. In thesis-based programs, the supervisor reviews the thesis in draft and in final form.

The supervisor, with the support of the individual graduate program area, should do the following:

  • provide an environment for the student that is conducive to research and in which the student can grow intellectually;
  • provide appropriate guidance to the student on the nature of research and the standard expected, and be accessible to give advice and constructive comment; at the beginning of the supervisory relationship, the student should be made aware of the normal expectations held by the supervisor and the department;
  • with the student, establish a realistic timetable for completion of various phases of the program;
  • consider a graduate student as a “junior colleague in research”;
  • ensure that there are sufficient material and supervisory resources for each graduate student under supervision;
  • work with the student to establish the supervisory committee as soon as possible after the start of the program and ensure that it maintains contact and formally meets at least once a year with the student;
  • when going on leave or an extended period of absence, ensure that the student is adequately supervised by the provision of an acting supervisor (who should be a member of the supervisory committee);
  • ensure that the student is aware of his/her guidelines (as listed above) and, when necessary, assist the student in meeting these;
  • set up committee meetings and examinations after consulting with, and with the full knowledge of, the student.

C. Fees

All graduate fees are indicated in Fees, section 5.0.

D. Academic Appeals

Graduate students may appeal matters of concern regarding Concordia University of Edmonton’s provision of education and academic services affecting their role as students, in accordance with Concordia University of Edmonton’s policies governing student academic appeals, as set out in the Calendar.

1. Informal Appeals

If grievances of an academic nature arise during a graduate program, the student should first attempt to resolve the matter by discussing the grievance with the instructor or supervisor concerned. If the matter is not resolved at this level, the student should consult with the Chair of the Master’s Program Committee (MPC).

Grievances involving the grading of course work come under the authority of the MPC for each program. If such grievances cannot be resolved by the instructor, the student may request a reappraisal of the grading of course work. This reappraisal shall be administered by the Chair of the MPC, which shall establish its own procedures. Grades may be raised or lowered as a result of the reappraisal. Decisions of the MPC with respect to grades are final and may not be appealed.

2. Formal Appeals

With the exception of the four areas listed at the end of this section, grievances that are not resolved at the MPC level may be appealed to the Dean of Graduate Studies if there is evidence that a miscarriage of justice has occurred. The student must submit a signed letter of appeal to the Dean of Graduate Studies. This letter must include the decision that is being appealed, the grounds for appeal, and the remedy sought by the appellant. The letter must be accompanied by all relevant evidence to support the claim. If the Dean determines that there is no cause for appeal, the appeal will not proceed. If the Dean determines that there is cause for appeal, the Dean will forward the appeal letter and supporting documentation to the Academic Appeals Committee established by the Graduate Policy Committee (GPC).

The Academic Appeals Committee shall consist of three members, as well as a non-voting Chair. Two members of the committee and the Chair shall be faculty members eligible to teach and examine in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The other member shall be a full-time graduate student in good academic standing and recommended by the Graduate Students’ Association. The non-voting Chair is responsible to ensure appropriate process. No member of the committee may have been previously involved in the case. Decisions of the Academic Appeals Committee are final.

The Academic Appeals Committee shall have no authority to hear an appeal with respect to the following matters in the Faculty of Graduate Studies:

  1. academic decisions regarding the assignment of grades in individual courses;
  2. academic decisions regarding an examination, project evaluation, or thesis defense;
  3. decisions to refuse admission or readmission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies;
  4. decisions relating to the granting of credit for courses taken or to be taken outside of Concordia University of Edmonton.
3. Reappraisal of Final Grades

If a student can provide evidence that a mistake has been made in the calculation of the final grade in a course, the student should follow the Informal Appeals procedure as detailed in section D.1.

A student may apply for a formal reappraisal of a final grade(s) only if he or she can provide evidence that a miscarriage of justice has occurred in the final assessment of the student’s course work.

Without such evidence, the reappraisal will not proceed. The final grade may be raised or lowered as a result of the reappraisal.

There are two levels of appeal. The student must begin with the first level. If the student is dissatisfied with the level-1 decision and the appropriate conditions exist (see below), the student has the right to proceed to a level-2 appeal:

Decisions of the Reappraisal Committee are final and may not be appealed.

E. Graduation and Convocation

There are three conferral dates each year, normally held in September, January, and May. For further information, see Graduation, section 9.7.

In order to convocate, students in thesis-based programs must complete all course work and submit the number of unbound copies of the thesis required by their department to the Faculty of Graduate Studies by the deadline dates specified in the Academic Schedule, section 2.0.

Students in course-based programs must complete all program requirements prior to the deadlines set out in the Academic Schedule.

13.1 Graduate Regulations

Graduate students are subject to policies in other sections of this Calendar that apply to all Concordia University of Edmonton students. See in particular Registration Procedures, section 4.1, Registration Regulations, section 4.2, Changing Registration, section 4.3, Student Life, section 8.0, and Academic Regulations, section 9.0.

13.1.1 Graduate Admission

Concordia University of Edmonton welcomes applications from those who wish to pursue graduate studies and research, including students from other provinces and countries.

There is no general right of admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies; Concordia University of Edmonton may at its discretion refuse admission to any applicant. Due to the limited enrolment capacity of Concordia University of Edmonton’s graduate programs, admission is competitive; meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission.

Graduate Admission Applications, transcripts, and supporting documents are received and compiled by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Completed applications are reviewed by the appropriate Master’s Program Committee (MPC), which makes recommendations to the Dean of Graduate Studies as to the student’s admissibility according to the graduate program’s requirements. All applicants are notified in writing as to the admission decision of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Successful applicants are required to pay a non-refundable registration deposit (section 5.2) to confirm their acceptance of the offer of admission. Normally, an applicant’s decision to accept an offer of admission must be received within three weeks of the offer date.

An admission decision is normally valid only for the academic year in which it is granted. If applicants are accepted by Concordia University of Edmonton and choose not to register in their program on the original start date, they may request a deferral to start their program on the next available start date in the same academic year. If applicants desire a deferral, they must submit a new application (which will normally not be subject to re-assessment) and pay the application fee again.

If applicants do not register in their program during the academic year for which they have been accepted but later wish to be considered for admission, they must submit a new application which will be subject to re-assessment.

A. General Admission Requirements

The minimum requirements to the Faculty of Graduate Studies are outlined below. Applicants are reminded that individual graduate programs may impose additional admission requirements.

To be considered for admission, applicants must present the following minimum requirements:

  1. A four-year baccalaureate degree from Concordia University of Edmonton or its equivalent from a recognized institution. Individual graduate programs may recommend applicants as qualifying/probationary students (e.g., those with three-year degrees).
  2. An admission grade point average (AGPA) of 3.0 (on Concordia University of Edmonton’s 4-point scale) or equivalent on the most recent 60 credits of undergraduate (or graduate) study. The AGPA is calculated using the most recently attempted credits, including failing marks. Normally, courses completed in the spring and summer session immediately preceding the term of admission are not calculated in the AGPA.
  3. Demonstrated fulfilment of the English Language Requirement, section C.

Applicants must be recommended for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies by the Master’s Program Committee (MPC) of the graduate program to which they are seeking admission.

For further requirements and exceptions, see section D.4.

B. Application

Applicants are advised to consult table 13.1.1, Graduate Studies Admission Deadlines regarding the due date for application documents. Applicants are encouraged to visit http://graduatestudies.concordia.ab.ca well in advance of admission deadlines to maximize consideration for admission.

Concordia University of Edmonton’s Graduate Admission Application is available online at http://graduatestudies.concordia.ab.ca. An application for admission to a graduate program is complete when all of the following have been received by the Faculty of Graduate Studies:

  1. The Graduate Admission Application, completed in full.
  2. Official transcripts and degree certificates from all post-secondary institutions attended.
  3. Official transcripts of graduate admission tests required for admission to the graduate program.
  4. Original supporting documents required for admission to the graduate program.
  5. Demonstrated fulfilment of the English Language Requirement, section C.
  6. Payment of the Application Fee, section 5.0.1.

Incomplete applications are not considered.

1. Ownership of Documents

All documents, including official transcripts, received by the Faculty of Graduate Studies become the property of Concordia University of Edmonton and are not returned to the student under any circumstance. Concordia University of Edmonton does not release these documents to third parties unless required by law.

2. Misrepresentation

Misrepresentation, falsification of documents, or withholding requested information are serious offences. If at any time it is discovered that students have misrepresented facts, falsified documents, or withheld requested information on official Faculty of Graduate Studies forms, they may be subject to one or more of the following penalties:

  1. Verbal and/or written reprimand
  2. Disciplinary or academic probation
  3. Cancellation of admission and/or registration
  4. Requirement to withdraw from the institution
  5. Placement on Document Alert, a national warning notification list used by post-secondary institutions
  6. Prosecution under the Criminal Code of Canada.

Individuals interested in applying to study at Concordia University of Edmonton should review section 8.7.3, Applicant Conduct. [Approved by General Faculties Council on June 10, 2016]

C. English Language Requirement

English is the principal language of instruction at Concordia University of Edmonton. To ensure that graduate students have the best opportunity to achieve academic success, all applicants whose first language is not English (regardless of citizenship or country of origin) are required to demonstrate English language proficiency prior to admission, in one of the following ways:

  1. Successful completion of a degree or its academic equivalent from a recognized academic institution in which English is the primary language of instruction (Note: The Faculty of Graduate Studies reserves the right to determine whether a particular institution is recognized as an institution in which the language of instruction is English.)
  2. A satisfactory score on one of the following approved English language proficiency examinations, taken within the last two years, as described below:
    • CAEL (Canadian Academic English Language) Assessment. The minimum satisfactory overall score is 60, with at least 60 on each subtest.
    • Successful completion of Concordia University of Edmonton’s English for Academic Purposes (EAP) program EAP Tier 1 and EAP Tier 2 or EAP Tier 2 with a minimum score of C or higher in each tier satisfies Concordia University of Edmonton’s broader English Language Requirement for admission to Concordia University of Edmonton’s Graduate Degree programs. Successful EAP performance is considered one component of an application to any academic program; admission requirements and competitiveness (if applicable) to any degree program is still required.
    • IELTS (International English Language Testing System) academic module. The minimum satisfactory overall score is 6.0, with no individual band below 6.0. [Approved by General Faculties Council on April 8, 2016]
    • Pearson Test of English (Academic). The minimum satisfactory score is 54. The Pearson Test is not accepted for admission to the Psychological Assessment programs in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
    • MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery). The minimum satisfactory score is 85.
    • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). The minimum satisfactory score is 550 (PBT) or 80 (iBT). When requesting that official TOEFL test scores be sent to Concordia University of Edmonton of Edmonton, students should indicate Concordia University of Edmonton’s institution code, 0916.
    • Successful completion of Pathway III offered through International Language Academy of Canada (ILAC).

D. Admission Classification

Students are admitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies at Concordia University of Edmonton on the basis of their previous academic record. Students may be admitted as full-time or part-time and are classified as one of the following:

1. Regular Graduate Students
are students who, having met all the admission requirements, are registered in a faculty-approved graduate program at Concordia University of Edmonton.
2. Qualifying Graduate Student
meet the admission requirements for a graduate program but lack the background in a chosen area of specialization to pursue graduate studies in that area. Qualifying graduate students are registered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies but are not candidates for a degree/diploma/certificate.
During the qualifying period, which normally should not exceed one year or five full-course equivalents, students are required to complete courses specified by the department concerned.
In addition to the required courses, the student may be permitted to take one or more graduate courses with the permission of the PAC. Upon the student’s satisfactory completion of qualifying work, the department may recommend that the student be reclassified as one of the following: (a) probationary graduate student or (b) regular graduate student. This reclassification is not automatic and is dependent on the student’s academic performance.
Qualifying graduate students are required to pay the tuition fees for all courses taken during the qualifying period. Neither the non-program courses taken nor the fees paid during the qualifying period may be credited toward a subsequent degree/diploma/certificate program.
3. Probationary Graduate Students
are those whose academic record is either (a) difficult to assess, as may be the case of students from foreign universities, or (b) below the academic standard required by a department.
A probationary graduate student is admitted under the following conditions:

  1. In the first one-semester term in which the probationary graduate student registers, he or she must take the courses and workload specified by the department at the time of admission.
  2. The probationary graduate student must meet all probationary conditions and achieve the minimum grades established by the department.
  3. The probationary conditions will be clearly stated in the student’s admission letter, followed by the statement that if the student fails to satisfy the stated conditions, the student may not be allowed to continue in the program.

After the first term of probationary registration, the following regulations apply:

    1. Full-time Students: If the full-time probationary graduate student satisfies all of the probationary conditions of admission, the department recommends that the student be accepted as a regular graduate student. All graduate courses successfully completed during the probationary term may be credited toward the student’s graduate degree/diploma/certificate.
    2. Part-time Students: If the part-time probationary graduate student meets all of the probationary conditions in the first term, the department may recommend a second term of probationary registration and shall specify the conditions of that registration.
    3. If a student fails to meet all of the conditions of admission as a probationary graduate student, the department recommends one of the following to the Faculty of Graduate Studies:
      1. that the student be allowed to register for a second one-semester term as a probationary graduate student. This written recommendation to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must include the following: (a) an indication of how an Incomplete or Failure in a course will be managed and (b) a specification of the minimum number of graduate courses that are to be taken by the student.
      2. that the student may be permitted to register as a qualifying student provided that he or she has not already been admitted as a qualifying student.
      3. that the student not be permitted further registrations in the program. This written recommendation to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must include a rationale for the decision.

Any student who fails to meet the conditions of a second probationary registration may not continue in the program.

Probationary graduate students are not considered to be candidates for a degree/diploma/certificate.

4. Special Graduate Students
are those who take graduate courses without proceeding to a graduate degree/diploma/certificate at Concordia University of Edmonton. They must meet the general admission requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. However, with the consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies and the appropriate Director, students may be admitted as special graduate students for graduate certificate courses even though they do not meet general requirements for Graduate Studies.
A special graduate student is not a candidate for a degree/diploma/certificate at Concordia University of Edmonton and will not receive any residence or fee credit toward a subsequent degree/diploma/certificate program at Concordia University of Edmonton for work completed as a special graduate student.
Admission as a special graduate student does not imply eligibility for admission to a degree/diploma/certificate program in any department. Individuals who wish to study under this classification must apply and be admitted each year in which they take courses.
Special graduate students require written permission from the department concerned to register in a course.
Probationary status as a special graduate student may be granted on an individual basis.
5. Visiting Graduate Students
are those who are registered at another university that does not have an exchange agreement with Concordia University of Edmonton. Students must obtain written permission from their host institution and from Concordia University of Edmonton to take one or more courses for transfer credit toward the graduate degree program at their home institution.

13.1.2 Transfers, Course Exemptions, and Substitution

  1. Thesis-based programs: The total course work credit weight required for any thesis-based program may not be reduced by more than one third (1/3) through any combination of transfer credit and course exemption from the requirement set out in each department’s program. Refer to Exceptions, section D.3
  2. Course-based programs: The number of courses nearest to, but not exceeding, one third (1/3) of the total units of course weight of a student’s program can be met through transfer credit and/or course exemption if recommended by the department and approved by the Faculty of Graduate Studies on a case-by-case basis.

A. Definitions

  1. Transfer Credit refers to the formal transfer of credit for a course(s) which has been earned outside the program. Transfer credit for certain courses may be granted by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, provided the courses have not been counted toward a previous degree/diploma/certificate or program and were not used to satisfy admission requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
  2. Course Exemption refers to the reduction in required credit weights of a student’s program by removal of specific courses normally required. In special circumstances, the Faculty of Graduate Studies may approve exemption of certain courses if the student has completed appropriate equivalent course work at Concordia University of Edmonton or elsewhere, but the program may not be reduced by more than the value set out above.
    1. Course exemptions are recommended by the administrator of the program area to the Dean of Graduate Studies.
    2. Decisions concerning course exemptions can not be appealed under Concordia University of Edmonton’s appeal procedures
    3. Applications for a course exemption for any course must be submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies Office at least two weeks before the term in which the course is offered. See Academic Schedule, section 2.0.
  3. Course Substitution means that a department may, at its discretion, exempt specific required courses from a student’s program to substitute more appropriate courses equivalent in weight to the courses exempted.
  4. Limits. The description of each graduate program in this Calendar contains a listing of the required and optional courses.

B. Exceptions

For students who have commenced an equivalent graduate program at a recognized university and are relocating to Concordia University of Edmonton, consideration will be given to departmental recommendations for transfer credit which exceeds the limit stated above. See department program descriptions for exemptions specific to individual programs.

Students should note that they cannot apply directly for transfer credit or course exemption; the department, through the MPC, must petition the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

13.1.3 Registration

A. Academic Standing

1. Grading System
Descriptor Alpha Grade Grade Point Value
Excellent A+ 4
A 4
A– 3.7
Good B+ 3.3
B 3
Satisfactory B– 2.7
C+ 2.3
Fail C 2
C– 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1
F 0
Other Final Grades:
CR Credit (C+ or higher)
NC No Credit
2. Academic Standards

For students in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the normal passing grade is C+. A student who receives two or more grades below a C+ may be Required to Withdraw from the program, regardless of his/her overall GPA in the program.

All students in graduate programs must maintain a minimum cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.7. In cases where the cumulative Grade Point Average falls between 2.3 and 2.7, graduate programs may recommend that the student be Required to Withdraw from the program, or that the student be permitted to continue in the program for a specified probation period; continued unsatisfactory performance may result in the student being Required to Withdraw from the program.

A student must obtain a minimum Grade Point Average of 2.7 to graduate from the program.

The above are minimum grades and grade point averages acceptable for the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Graduate programs may require higher grades than these.

3. Master of Arts (MA) Examination Committee (thesis-based programs)

The MA Examination Committee will consist of the following members:

  1. A neutral chair, chosen from a department other than the student’s department; the chair functions solely to guide the process of the examination.
  2. The student’s supervisor
  3. An external examiner, chosen from a department other than the student’s department
  4. A second reader from the graduate faculty in the student’s department.
4. Grading of MA Thesis

Following the completion of the MA examination, the MA Examination Committee will assign one of the following verbal evaluations to the thesis:

  • Acceptable, with no revisions
  • Acceptable, with minor revisions
  • Acceptable, with major revisions
  • Unacceptable

Students whose theses are judged to be “Acceptable, with minor/major revisions” will be required to resubmit their theses by the established time limit for their program. Refer to Time Limits, section 13.1.2.B.2.

“Unacceptable” theses will be assigned a mark of “no credit”.

In cases in which the MA Examination Committee judges a thesis to be of exceptional quality, the Committee may make a formal recommendation to the Dean of Graduate Studies that the student be awarded a Faculty of Graduate Studies Thesis Award or any other thesis award that may be instituted at Concordia University of Edmonton. When such thesis awards are approved, the name of the award will be noted on the student’s academic transcript.

B. Maintenance of Registration

Students must maintain continuous registration in the program. Students who do not register in any academic year are considered to have withdrawn from their graduate program.

Course-based programs: Students in course-based graduate programs must register in a minimum of 3 credits of course work or in M REG 600 Maintaining Registration for at least one term in each September-to-August period to keep the program active.

Thesis-based programs: In order to keep their program active, students registered in thesis-based programs must register each Fall and Winter semester until the program is completed. Students not registered in course work or thesis must register in M REG 600 both terms of Fall and Winter in order to keep their programs active.

Students who have registered in Fall/Winter and are working only on thesis research during May to August do not need to register separately for this period.

Full-time students who are registered in full-time thesis in the second year of the program will be assessed a per-credit thesis fee at the rate of 6 credits in the Fall term and 6 credits in the Winter term. Fees for continuing thesis registration after the second year of full-time registration will be assessed a per-credit fee at the rate of 6 credits per term.
Note: All students in thesis based programs are required to register in and be assessed fees for a minimum of 12 credits thesis: see “#6 Minimum credit requirement for registration” below.

Failure to maintain registration: Students who fail to keep the program active as described above will be considered to have withdrawn from their program. If they wish to resume work on the program, they must apply for readmission by submitting a new application and paying the application fee. They will have their program reassessed in terms of the regulations in force at the time of reapplication. There is no guarantee of readmission.

Leave of absence: Students who anticipate an interruption in their program must apply for a leave of absence to the Master’s Program Committee of their program for approval by the Faculty of Graduate Studies (see #7).

Incompletes and extensions: Students are required to complete the requirements of all courses (including research projects in course-based programs) within the time limits of an academic term. In exceptional circumstances, students may apply for time extensions for the purpose of completing course requirements (see #8).

1. Residence

Course-based programs: Over the duration of their program, students in course-based master’s graduate programs must complete a minimum of 2/3 of the total number of credits required for the program at Concordia University of Edmonton. This is a minimum requirement; students are required to fulfill the department requirements, which may be higher.

Thesis-based programs: Over the duration of their program, students in thesis-based master’s programs must complete a minimum of 2/3 of the total course work plus the thesis at Concordia University of Edmonton. This is a minimum requirement; students are required to fulfill the department’s thesis-based program requirements, which may be higher.

2. Time Limits

The time limit (or maximum period of time permitted to complete the requirements for a degree) is calculated from the start of the term in which the student first registers in that specific program.

Thesis-based master’s students normally must complete all the requirements within four years of the term in which they first register as probationary graduate students or as regular graduate students.

Course-based master’s students normally must complete all requirements within six years of the term in which they first register as probationary graduate students or as candidates in the master’s program, unless the department has indicated a shorter time limit.

In exceptional circumstances, a candidate who has failed to complete all the requirements for the degree within the appropriate period specified above may be granted an extension upon departmental recommendation and approval by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

3. Registration at the end of programs

Course-based programs: When a student in a course-based program completes all of the course work and other requirements and the department submits a Notice of Final Completion for Course-Based Master’s Degree to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the student’s name will be forwarded to the Registrar’s Office to be included in the list of graduates for the next convocation.

Thesis-based programs: Students in thesis-based master’s programs must register in a Thesis during the registration period in which the thesis and accompanying evidence of program completion is submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. This enables the Faculty of Graduate Studies to award credit for the thesis at that time. Thesis-based programs are not recorded as complete until the thesis and accompanying documentation have been submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

4. Registration Status

A student’s registration status is determined automatically by the total number of credits (including a project or a thesis, where appropriate) in which the student is enrolled in a given semester. Audited courses are not included in the calculation of registration status.

Full-time registration: These students are registered in 60% or more of the full (normal) semester course load of their graduate program.

Part-time registration: These students are registered in less than 60% of the full (normal) semester course load of their graduate program.

This means, for example, that in a course-based program in which the full (normal) course load is 15 credits/semester, students must register in at least 9 credits/semester to be considered full time. In a thesis-based program in which the full (normal) course load is 9 credits/semester, students must register in at least 6 credits/semester to be considered full-time.

M REG 600 Maintaining Registration: Students who are not registered in any courses in a given term, and are not working on a thesis or project research, but still wish to maintain their status as graduate students register in M REG 600. The time during which a student is registered in Maintaining Registration is counted in the time limit for completion of the degree program.

Fees for M REG 600 are assessed at a rate equivalent to a 3-credit registration (see section 5.0, Fees).

5. Registration Procedure

All registrations for newly admitted and continuing graduate students, as well as for Special and Visiting students, will be processed by the Registrar’s Office

Step 1. Registration Counselling: All graduate students in degree/diploma/certificate programs must consult with their department and discuss their program with their supervisor prior to registering.

Research Project Registration for students in course-based master’s programs involves registering in the appropriate 500-level course. Registration in this course is restricted to students in a course-based graduate degree program.

Thesis Registration is restricted to students in thesis-based graduate degree programs. Qualifying, Special, and Visiting graduate students may not register in Thesis.

Step 2. Register: Once newly-admitted and continuing graduate students in degree programs have determined their program requirements in consultation with their departments, they register through the Faculty of Graduate Studies office.

Step 3. Confirm Registration: To retain their registration, all students must confirm their registration online before the deadlines published in the Academic Schedule, section 2.0. For policies governing the confirming and changing of registration, refer to Changing Registration, section 4.3

6. Minimum credit requirements for registration

Course based programs: Over the duration of their program, students in course-based master’s programs must register in and be assessed fees for a minimum of 24 credits. This is a minimum requirement; students are required to fulfil the department requirements, which may be higher than the minimum of 24 credits.

Thesis-based programs: Over the duration of their program, students in thesis-based master’s programs must register in and be assessed fees for a minimum of 12 credits thesis and 12 credits course work, for a total of 24 credits. This is a minimum requirement; students are required to fulfil the department’s thesis-based program requirements, which may be higher than the minimum of 24 credits.

7. Leave of Absence

Leave of Absence (LOA) status may be granted when a student is unable to work on his/her program as a result of serious constraints such as family emergencies, medical requirements, and parental or caregiving responsibilities; but work, holiday, or travel during a single term is not justification for a formal leave of absence.

A student may apply for a leave of absence for a period of four months, eight months, or twelve months. The leave will begin on the first day of an academic term. Whenever possible, the student should apply for the leave of absence before the starting date of the anticipated leave, or as soon as possible after the event necessitating the leave occurs. It is preferable if the beginning and end of a leave coincide with the beginning and end of an academic semester or registration year. Leave is not granted retroactively, nor to a student whose registration is not current, or whose time in the program has elapsed. The leave time is not included in the time period for completion of the degree.

During a leave of absence the student is expected not to be working on a graduate program; the student on LOA does not pay fees and is not entitled to those services that are normally provided to students.

Graduate students on LOA are not eligible to receive awards. The leave period is not included in the time period for award tenure. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the proposed leave is compatible with the regulations of any granting agency from which funding would normally be received during the leave period, and that such agencies are informed of the proposed leave. Recipients of student loan funding should clarify the consequences that such a leave will have on their repayment status. Information can be found at www.studentaid.alberta.ca. International students should consult the immigration authorities regarding their immigration status during the proposed leave.

Registration in courses during the leave period will be cancelled. If the cancellation occurs before the fee payment deadline for that term, the courses will not show on the transcript. If the cancellation occurs after the add/drop deadline, the courses will be shown with the notation W (withdrew). Tuition fees will be assessed in the normal fashion for any terms in the program before or after the leave period. If the student is enrolled in any portion of the term after the add/drop deadline for that term, fees will be assessed for that term. General fees will be assessed when the leave period overlaps the annual registration date, to maintain the student’s status in the program and to allow access to Concordia University of Edmonton facilities.

Leave of Absence Procedure:

  1. student negotiates the leave with his/her supervisor and obtains from the supervisor a formal letter of approval to grant a leave.
  2. student and the supervisor seek approval of the Master’s Program Committee and obtain a letter of approval to grant a leave.
  3. student submits the following documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for approval:,/li>
    1. a formal written request by the student for the leave, explaining the reasons for the request, and including any appropriate supporting documentation (such as a letter from a doctor);
    2. the supervisor’s letter of approval to grant a leave;
    3. the Master’s Program Committee’s letter of approval to grant a leave.

If the Faculty of Graduate Studies approves the request, the Faculty will notify the Registrar’s Office.

8. Incompletes and Extensions

The Faculty of Graduate Studies adheres to the policy on incomplete work as it is defined in Incomplete Work, section 9.2.4. Graduate students who require extensions to the deadline for the completion of course work must, in consultation with their instructor, submit an Application for Incomplete to the Faculty of Graduate Studies office on or before the last day of lectures for courses. In such cases, instructors will assign a grade of I (Incomplete) to a student for the course (including for a research project for a course-based program). Students who fail to submit completed work by the date designated by the instructor will be assigned a grade of F (Fail) for the incomplete work. (The Faculty of Graduate Studies may consider a written request from a Master’s Program Committee for an extension beyond the deadline set by the Faculty of Graduate Studies office only under exceptional circumstances.)

When the student completes the course requirements, the instructor forwards the student’s final grade to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for approval; the approved new grade is then recorded by the Registrar’s Office, and the grade of I (Incomplete) is removed from the student’s record. If the course requirements are not met by the extended deadline, the student will receive a grade of F (Fail) for the incomplete work, which will be factored into the calculation of the final course grade.

For research projects in course-based programs only: If a student anticipates that he/she will not be able to meet the course requirements of the research project by the typical 4-week extension deadline, the students may apply to his/her Master’s Program Committee for a four-month extension. If the Master’s Program Committee approves this application, the committee will recommend to the Faculty of Graduate Studies that the student be allowed to re-register in that course. The new deadline will be the last class of the semester immediately following the term in which the student was originally registered in the research course. This application for re-registration and four-month extension must be made before the original extension deadline date: that is, while the student is officially in the course and in Incomplete status.

The re-registration must be in the term immediately following the term of the original registration. The fee for this re-registration will be 50% of the full fee for the course.

The grade for the term in which the student registered remains on the transcript as I (Incomplete). The grade for the term in which the student re-registers will be the final grade and will be based on the work that is completed; any incomplete work is assigned a mark of F (Fail).

Should a student require a further four-month extension to complete the research project, that student will again have to apply to the Master’s Program Committee. If the Master’s Program Committee approves the application, the cost for the second re-registration will be 100% of the full fee for the course.

9. Thesis Registration (Thesis-based programs)

Thesis registration will always be considered a full-time registration. Students are required to register in Thesis 712 in each semester in which they are working on their thesis, for a minimum of two semesters and thereafter each semester until the thesis is satisfactorily completed. Students are required to register in the term in which they defend the thesis and complete the degree requirements.

At the completion of a graduate program, the thesis will be given the number of credits that have been assigned to it in the program design.

Students wishing to convocate at the Spring convocation of a particular year must submit the final draft of the master’s thesis to the thesis supervisor no later than the first day of classes after the Winter semester Reading Week. Students seeking degree conferral at the end of September or the end of January must consult with the Chair of the Master’s Program Committee.

Thesis 712: (Full-time registration): Students are required to register in Thesis 712 in two semesters and to pay the tuition fees for two full-time Thesis registrations (fees equivalent to 6 credits per semester).

13.2 Student Support

Concordia University of Edmonton values the uniqueness, the potential, the integrity, and the well-being of every student that it serves. The Concordia University of Edmonton Graduate Student Association (CGSA) safeguards the interests of graduate students. The Association provides the opportunity for graduate students to support one another and to deal with common concerns. It is from this Association that a representative is drawn to serve on the Graduate Policy Committee (GPC).

Concordia University of Edmonton’s graduate faculty are expected to be committed to the graduate programs and to the intellectual development of graduate students through sustained participation in activities involving graduate students, such as colloquia, conferences, scholarly presentations, and other public lectures and events.

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships may be offered to well-qualified candidates. Information concerning further available assistantships, graduate scholarships, and research grants is regularly published by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

13.2.1 Graduate Financial Aid

For complete information refer to Financial Aid, section 6.0.

13.2.2 Graduate Awards

13.2.2.1 Alberta Scholarship Programs

Funded by a $100-million endowment from the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund, the Alberta Scholarship Programs are designed to stimulate the pursuit of excellence by recognizing outstanding achievement and by encouraging and assisting Albertans to achieve their fullest potential – whether intellectual, cultural, social, or physical. A list of scholarships is available from Admissions and Financial Aid or through the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) website www.alis.alberta.ca.

A. Graduate Student Scholarship

Annual $3,000 award to a graduate student who displays outstanding academic achievement. The recipient must have completed a minimum of 80% of a full-course load and achieved a minimum GPA of 3.5 in his/her first year of study, be continuing full-time in the second year of his/her program of study, and be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada and resident of Alberta. No application is required.

B. Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship

Annual awards up to $10,800 to graduate students who display outstanding academic achievement and scholarship and research capacity. Recipients must present a minimum GPA of 3.5 in their qualifying year of study, be registered full-time in the first or second year of their program, be citizens or permanent residents of Canada at the time of their application and be Alberta residents as defined by the Alberta Scholarship Programs. Recipients cannot simultaneously hold a Canada Graduate Scholarship. An application is required.

13.2.2.2 Canada Graduate Scholarship — Master’s Program

The objective of the Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master’s (CGS M) Program is to help develop research skills and assist in the training of highly qualified personnel by financially supporting students who demonstrate a high standard of achievement in undergraduate and early graduate studies. This $17,500 award (non-renewable) supports students in all disciplines and is administered jointly by Canada’s three federal granting agencies: The Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). The selection process and post-award administration are carried out at the university level, under the guidance of the three agencies. Eligible Canadian universities receive agency-specific allocations and must award the scholarships according to their allocations. Concordia University of Edmonton has received one award allocation from SSHRC for the 2014, 2015 and 2016 CGS M competitions.

To apply for the CGS M Scholarship competition, applicants must submit the appropriate application and supporting documents by December 1. Applicants should consult the program overview and application instructions found on the NSERC website:www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Students-Etudiants/PG-CS/CGSM-BESCM_eng.asp. For more information, please contact a Financial Aid Advisor or the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

13.2.2.3 Academic Awards — Application required

Richard W. Kraemer Memorial Scholarship

An annual $1,500 award to a student enrolled in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies degree program. There are no restrictions on citizenship. The scholarship will be awarded on the basis of superior academic achievement and research potential. Preference will be given to a graduate student who is conducting research in the area of church history.
Donor: Friends and family of Dr. Richard Kraemer and Mount Calvary Lutheran Church. An application is required.
13.2.2.4 Academic Awards — No Application required

Graduate Academic Excellence Scholarship

A $2,500 award to full-time graduate students (Canadian citizens, Permanent Residents and International Visa students) who are working toward the completion of a master’s degree in MISSM or MISAM. Recipients must have completed a minimum of 80% of a full-course load (12 credits) in the qualifying term; earned a minimjum 3.7 GPA; and be registered in a minimum 60% of a full-course load (9 credits) in the subsequent semester in order to receive payment of the award. Concordia University of Edmonton automatically identifies eligible students at the end of each semester. Students may receive this award only once during their degree program. Students on an approved Leave of Absence may request a scholarship disbursement deferral.

Governor General’s Academic Medal (Gold)

A gold medal presented on behalf of and in the name of the Governor General of Canada to the student graduating with the highest academic standing in a graduate (i.e., master’s) degree program. This medal is awarded for academic excellence only.
The selection for the Governor General Gold Academic Medal is the responsibility of the Graduate Scholarship Committee which is comprised of the members of the Admissions and Scholarship Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies.
The following points shall serve as guidelines for the awarding of the Medal:

  1. Open to students enrolled in the Masters of Information System Security Management, Masters of Information Systems Assurance Management, and the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies degree programs.
  2. Normally, only students whose course progression has the greatest integrity are considered; i.e. students who complete their program in the normal length of the program.
  3. Academic standing is based on both the graduate grade point average (GGPA), calculated using the required credits for degree, the strength of the research record, and/or the strength of the thesis. The strength of the research record and/or the strength of the thesis are based on the recommendations of the Graduate Program.
  4. Thesis advisors and secondary readers will provide written statements that evaluate the thesis quality based on the originality of the work and the contribution to the field.

MA in Biblical and Christian Studies Entrance Scholarship

A $2,000 entrance scholarship awarded to superior applicants (no restriction on citizenship) who are entering full-time studies in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies program. The recipient must be entering their first year of the MA in Biblical and Christian Studies program; present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average of 3.5; be registered in at least 9 credits per semester; and demonstrate academic potential. Concordia University of Edmonton identifies eligible recipients through the admission process, choosing from those who submit their admission Application Forms (including sample essay, statement of interest, and transcripts), before July 1. The scholarship is disbursed in two equal payments. Recipients who interrupt their studies will immediately forfeit subsequent disbursements. Students on an approved Leave of Absence may request a scholarship disbursement deferral.

13.2.2.5 Concordia University of Edmonton Bursary Program

While students are expected to make plans for funding their education through primary sources such as personal and family savings, scholarships and awards, and employment earnings, etc., domestic and international students experiencing financial difficulties while attending Concordia University of Edmonton may apply for bursary assistance to supplement their existing funds. A Concordia University of Edmonton bursary is awarded based on financial need and is meant to supplement, not replace, other financial assistance. For further information on other forms of financial assistance, such as government student loans, see Financial Aid, section 6.0 or visit http://financialaid.concordia.ab.ca.

The bursary amounts can vary, depending on a student situation. Students who have demonstrated financial need but have not applied for government financial

assistance may be eligible for a $500 bursary. Students who are current recipients of government financial assistance may be eligible for a varying amounts up to a maximum of $1,500 per academic year. Students who begin their studies in January will only be eligible for half awards. The lifetime maximum amount of bursary assistance is $6,000.

To be eligible for a Concordia University of Edmonton Bursary, applicants must:

  1. Demonstrate financial need based on a modest standard of living
  2. Be enrolled in a graduate degree program.
  3. Be registered full-time (minimum 60% full-course load)
  4. Have achieved satisfactory academic standing on their most recent course work at the time of application as defined by their program of study (Academic Standing, section 9.3.4).
  5. Have not previously declared bankruptcy or defaulted on a student loan.

Student must complete an application online through Services for Students (http://onlineservices.concordia.ab.ca/student) and submit supporting documents by October 15th.

13.3 Graduate Degree Programs

13.3.1 Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies

The Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies is a program designed to enable students who have an undergraduate degree in the study of Christianity to continue their studies at the master’s level. This program is anchored in Concordia University of Edmonton’s mission to be “a community of learning grounded in scholarship, freedom, and the Christian faith, preparing students to be independent thinkers, ethical leaders, reflective servants in their occupations, and citizens for the common good.” Concordia University of Edmonton values “the importance of providing graduate education that engages students in creative research and that builds on, supports, and enlivens Concordia University of Edmonton’s research and undergraduate learning environments.”

We are looking for students who seek an informed, graduate-level understanding about the textual, historical, and theological issues at stake in Christianity.

A. Educational Objectives

Through graduate work followed by a thesis, students have the opportunity to study such areas in Christian Studies as Hebrew Scriptures, New Testament, Theology, History, and Philosophy. Graduates from this program will have a solid foundation for doctoral studies. They will also be able to pursue a range of career opportunities open to well-educated individuals who have the tools of critical and analytical scholarship. We intend that our graduates become knowledgeable leaders in educational and social institutions, as well as in churches.

The program has the following specific objectives:

  • To provide students with advanced instruction in the academic study of Christianity
  • To require students to be thoroughly conversant with the major scholarly contributions in their field.
  • To develop in students the ability to conduct advanced research.
  • To enable students to work independently and cooperatively with their peers and with professional academics in the field.
  • To enable students to be skilled and effective communicators of their knowledge and research findings.
  • To prepare students with the knowledge base and skills that will qualify them for a PhD program in a field of religion, theology, biblical studies, or Christian studies at universities offering such programs.
  • To foster in students the highest ethical and professional standards, and to provide an educational experience that makes possible the transformation and deepening of insight, perspective, values, and direction for the student.

B. Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the Admission and General Admission requirements for the Faculty of Graduate Studies (refer to section 13.1.1), students applying to the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies program must meet the following requirements:

  • Students should complete 36 undergraduate credits in Religious Studies, usually including 6 credits in one of the following concentration areas: 1) Hebrew Scriptures, 2) New Testament, 3) Christian Theology/History.
  • A minimum admission grade point average (AGPA) of 3.0 (on Concordia University of Edmonton’s 4-point scale) or equivalent on the most recent 60 credits of undergraduate (or graduate) study.
  • Students must have completed six credits of a language other than English. Those students who intend to study Hebrew Scriptures will have completed Biblical Hebrew. Those students who intend to study New Testament will have completed Classical/Koine Greek. Those students who intend to study Historical and Theological aspects of Christianity will have completed one of Latin, French, or German. Students who do not have these requirements upon application to the program will have their cases reviewed by the Master’s Program Committee (MPC). That committee may prescribe placement exams or make-up courses.

Applicants must also submit the following with their applications:

  • A recent written sample of work in the area of Biblical or Christian Studies, normally a research paper produced in the last two years of a BA program. Papers specifically prepared for application also will be accepted.
  • A statement of interest (approximately 500 words).
  • At least two letters of reference from two faculty members of the institution in which they completed most of their work in Religious Studies. One letter from an instructor in fields related to the study of Christianity (History or Philosophy) will be accepted. One letter must be from an instructor who has taught in the area of the student’s proposed graduate concentration (Hebrew Scriptures, New Testament, Christian Theology/History) and who can speak to the student’s competence in that area.

C. General Requirements

The Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies degree will be awarded for the successful completion of 30 credits with a GPA of 3.0 (B) or better.

For further information, please see Academic Schedule, section 2.0, Graduate Admission, section 13.1.1, Student Life, section 8.0, and Academic Regulations, section 9.0.

D. Program Requirements

The requirements of the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies program are as follows:

30 credits required, to include:

  1. 9 credits in 600-level BCS courses
  2. 6 credits in unspecified BCS courses
  3. 3 credits in Principles/Methodology of Biblical and Christian Studies
  4. 12 credits of Thesis

Graduate courses can be found in section 14.0, Course Descriptions, under the subject heading Biblical and Christian Studies (BCS).

E. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of the three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.3.2 Master of Information Systems Assurance Management

In all sectors of the economy, there is an increasing demand for skilled professionals with expertise in information security, assurance, auditing and governance. The Master of Information Systems Assurance Management (MISAM) meets these needs by providing in-depth education in information systems audit, assurance, and governance. Students learn both the theory and practice of information systems auditing and assurance and the role this plays in enterprise and information technology governance. Students are well prepared to enter information systems assurance, audit and governance roles immediately upon graduation as well as write two world-wide industry based certification exams in these areas. The MISAM program is delivered in a continuous learning format, consisting of sixteen courses and a major research project. The program is normally completed over five semesters.

A. Educational Objectives

The central educational objective of Concordia University of Edmonton is consistent with its mission: to provide students with a quality education in a Christian context while sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ, and in this way to develop in students a sense of vocation that is enriched by a high standard of morality and of ethical awareness. This first objective is the foundation for the more specific objectives of MISAM, which is designed to enable students to do the following:

  • To understand the process of auditing and in-depth knowledge of information systems auditing and general understanding of financial auditing.
  • To gain first-hand experience in conducting risk based information systems audits and in communicating the results to the enterprise.
  • To identify sources of risk for the loss of enterprise information and to develop methods of the financial resources available to mitigate these risks and provide assurance.
  • To gain a deep knowledge and appreciation of the role governance plays in the success of public and private sector organizations.
  • To understand the role of information systems security in relation to the other business assurance processes in an enterprise.
  • To develop a plan for the enterprise to recover from disasters and to test the plan in order to ensure that the plan is ready to be implemented when needed.
  • To investigate information systems security incidents and develop and implement solutions to recover or minimize any loss of information.
  • To develop an appropriate information security framework for an enterprise, including plans and policies which reflect recognized international standards from implementing security policy (based on identifying stakeholders, security teams and infrastructure, data resource owners, data custodians, and audit methods used to determine compliance).

B. Admission Requirements

Applications are encouraged from those individuals who possess an undergraduate baccalaureate degree. A four-year degree in business is preferred but a computing science degree is also accepted. All other degrees are given consideration since there may be industry certifications or work experience which might assist the application process. Space is limited and admission is competitive. Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission. To be considered for admission, applications must present the following requirements:

  1. Four-year Bachelor’s degree from a recognized educational institution, preferably in Business/Management, Management of Information Systems or Computing Science. Students entering the program require a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on the 4 point scale, or its equivalent during the last 60 credits of undergraduate (or graduate) study. Students with a three-year degree, for example, Concordia University of Edmonton’s three-year BSc, may be admissible but may be required to take qualifying courses.
  2. A resume with a statement of career objectives.
  3. A 3.0 GPA on at least two courses in financial accounting (one introductory and one intermediate) and one course in management accounting.
  4. A security clearance.
  5. Demonstrated fulfillment of Concordia University of Edmonton’s English Language Requirement.

C. General Academic Requirements

  1. Students must successfully complete 48 course credits in the program.
  2. Students must successfully complete 12 credits in a research project, which may or may not include a practicum (ISAM 580 or ISAM 581). Whether the student chooses a practicum-based research project or a research project only, the research must be presented to an audience comprising of faculty (including the faculty advisor), peers, and persons actively involved in the security industry.
  3. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 with no course grade less than 2.3 (C+). Students who do not maintain satisfactory standing may be placed on academic probation, required to withdraw from the program, or asked to retake the course.

For further information, please see Academic Schedule, section 2.0, Graduate Admission, section 13.1.1, Student Life, section 8.0, and Academic Regulations, section 9.0.

D. Program Requirements

60 credits required, to include:

  1. ISAM 512
  2. ISAM 521
  3. ISAM 522
  4. ISAM 558
  5. ISAM 542
  6. ISAM 549
  7. ISAM 580 or 581
  8. ISSM 521
  9. ISSM 538
  10. ISSM 541
  11. ISSM 543
  12. ISSM 545
  13. ISSM 551
  14. ISSM 553
  15. Two of ISSM 507, 525, 531, 533, 536, 541, 561 or 563

E. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of the three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.3.3 Master of Information System Security Management

In all sectors of the economy, there is an increasing demand for skilled professionals with expertise in information security. The Master of Information Systems Security Management (MISSM) meets these needs by providing in-depth education in security protocols, design, software, and management. Students explore protection strategies, including the planning, design, implementation, and management of complete network security solutions in multiple operating-system environments and configurations. Graduates will be able to assess and implement necessary safeguards to ensure the security of information systems. Program content includes network security policies, standards, and management; building and maintaining security firewalls; cryptography; international and national information security laws; ethics; disaster and recovery planning; risk management and analysis; and digital forensics.

The MISSM program is delivered in a continuous learning format, consisting of sixteen courses including a research component. The program is normally completed over five semesters. The intensity of the program (a) allows students to meet their educational goals in an efficient and timely manner and (b) enables students who possess a more general degree to focus on the specific knowledge and skills required in the emerging field of information systems security. The program is open to both full- and part-time students.

A. Educational Objectives

The central educational objective of Concordia University of Edmonton is consistent with its mission: to provide students with a quality education in a Christian context while sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ, and in this way to develop in students a sense of vocation that is enriched by a high standard of morality and of ethical awareness

This first objective is the foundation for the more specific objectives of MISSM, which is designed to enable students to do the following:

  • To identify sources of risk for the loss of enterprise information and to develop methods of minimizing the identified risks based on the priorities established by senior management and the financial resources available to mitigate these risks.
  • To understand the role of information systems security in relation to the other business processes in an enterprise.
  • To develop a plan for the enterprise to recover from disasters where information ceases to be available to users. They will also have the skills to test the plan and to ensure that the plan is ready to be implemented when needed.
  • To investigate information systems security incidents and develop and implement solutions to recover or minimize the loss of information.
  • To securely install operating system software and to use this software to build login servers and application servers which are highly resistant to penetration by unauthorized users (both internal and external).
  • To securely install servers on different operating environments.
  • To develop an appropriate information security framework for an enterprise, including plans and policies which reflect recognized standards for implementing security policy (based on identifying stakeholders, security teams and infrastructure, data resource owners, and auditing used to ensure compliance).
  • To determine legal issues involved in information systems security policy and architecture, and to know when to seek advanced legal help and/or help from law enforcement authorities.
  • To manage projects involving cryptographic architectures for security and to implement a variety of solutions involving cryptography.
  • To develop strategies for all methods of access control to an organization’s information systems and media containing organizational information (physical methods and network methods).
  • To ensure that an organization meets the appropriate federal or provincial privacy legislation.

B. Admission Requirements

Applications are encouraged from those individuals who possess an undergraduate baccalaureate degree. A four-year degree in computing science, science, or business is preferred, but all degrees are given consideration. Space is limited and admission is competitive. Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission.

To be considered for admission, applicants must present the following requirements:

  1. An undergraduate degree from a recognized educational institution: normally a four-year Bachelor’s degree (preferably in business, engineering or computing science); students with a three-year degree (for example, Concordia University of Edmonton’s three-year BSc) may be admissible but may be required to take qualifying courses; students with an applied degree plus three years of work experience (in addition to the work experience which was part of the applied degree) may also be considered for admission.
  2. An admission grade point average (AGPA) of at least 3.0 (on Concordia University of Edmonton’s 4-point scale) or equivalent on the most recently completed 60 credits.
  3. A security clearance.
  4. Demonstrated fulfilment of Concordia University of Edmonton’s English Language Requirement, section 13.1.1.C.
  5. A minimum grade of 3.0 on a general Network Technology course and 3.0 on an Operating Systems course or equivalent knowledge. Concordia University of Edmonton reserves the right to assess equivalent courses from other institutions. A student may also challenge that he or she has obtained the knowledge from this course as a result of course work, work experience, or other experience. In these cases, the student will be allowed to write a qualifying exam for one or both of these courses (a fee is charged for this service). If successful in this entrance exam (a mark not less than 3.0), the student would be admitted to the program provided he or she meets all other requirements.
  6. Students who graduated from the After-Degree Diploma in Information Systems Security (ADDISS) Program may apply and request advanced standing in the courses they took in the program, provided they have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the ADDISS program with no mark less than C+. Concordia University of Edmonton reserves the right to assess and determine admissibility. Students must demonstrate that they have worked in and remain current in the field. ADDISS graduates from 2004 or earlier will not necessarily be given advanced standing in all previously completed courses.

All grades used in calculating the AGPA are adjusted according to Concordia University of Edmonton’s grade conversion scale.

C. General Academic Requirements

  1. Students must successfully complete 48 course credits in the program.
  2. Students must successfully complete 9 credits in a research project, which may or may not include a practicum (ISSM 580 or ISSM 581), and culminating in a formal report of the student’s research evaluated by an internal committee.
  3. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 with no course grade less than “C+”. Students who do not maintain satisfactory standing may be placed on academic probation, required to withdraw from the program, or asked to retake the course.

For further information, please see Academic Schedule, section 2.0, Graduate Admission, section 13.1.1, Student Life, section 8.0, and Academic Regulations, section 9.0.

D. Program Requirements

60 credits required, to include:

  1. One of ISSM 503, 507, or 542
  2. ISSM 521
  3. ISSM 525
  4. ISSM 531
  5. ISSM 533
  6. ISSM 535
  7. ISSM 536
  8. ISSM 538
  9. ISSM 541
  10. ISSM 543
  11. ISSM 545
  12. ISSM 551
  13. ISSM 553
  14. ISSM 559
  15. ISSM 561
  16. ISSM 580 or 581

E. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see a href=”#13.0.2.E”>Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.4 Graduate Diploma Programs

13.4.1 Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice

The practice of environmental public health is critical to the wellness of communities. This diploma explores all aspects if the natural and built environment that can influence human health and disease. Students will be exposed to the diversity of the field including food and drinking water safety, waste management, air and soil quality, communicable disease control, emergency response and occupational health.

Courses from this diploma may be used towards the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) with the exception that students who undertake ENVH 621 and ENVH 622 will be required to attend the laboratories of ENVH 521 and ENVH 522.

A. Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are:

  1. A four-year baccalaureate degree from Concordia or its equivalent from a recognized institution. (The baccalaureate degree should be in a related background including but not limited to health care, science, agriculture, and engineering. Open studies graduate students would be welcomed to register in these courses)
  2. An admission grade point average (AGPA) of 3.0 (on Concordia’s 4-Point Scale) or equivalent on the most recent 60 credits of undergraduate (or graduate) study.
  3. Successful completion of 3 credits in chemistry, 3 credits in microbiology and 3 credits in human or mammalian physiology.
  4. Demonstrated fulfilment of Concordia’s English Language Requirement.
  5. A statement of career interests and a resume are also required at the time of application.

Following the initial review of applications, qualified applicants who satisfy the admission requirements are forwarded to the department for assessment which may involve an interview. The procedure is designed to assess applicants’ nonacademic qualifications, suitability for the program, and potential for success in the courses.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 18 credits required, to include:
    1. ENVH 601
    2. ENVH 602
    3. ENVH 611
    4. ENVH 612
    5. ENVH 621
    6. ENVH 622
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 in the required courses.
  3. must complete 12 of 18 credits at Concordia University of Edmonton.
  4. complete program within 2 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.4.2 Graduate Diploma in Information Assurance

A. Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are:

*Note: Students with a three-year Bachelor degree may be admissible but may be required to take qualifying courses.

  1. Four-year Bachelor degree* from a recognized educational institution, preferably in business/management, management of information systems or computing science. Students entering the program require a minimum GPA of 3.0 or equivalent in the last 60 credits of undergraduate study;
  2. A resume with a statement of career objectives;
  3. A GPA of 3.0 in at least two courses in financial accounting (one introductory and one intermediate) and one course in management accounting or equivalent course work;
  4. A security clearance;
  5. Demonstrated fulfilment of Concordia University of Edmonton’s English Language Requirement.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 18 credits required, to include:
    1. ISAM 512
    2. ISAM 521
    3. ISAM 522
    4. ISAM 542
    5. ISSM 553
    6. ISAM 563
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the required courses.
  3. complete program within 6 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.4.3 Graduate Diploma in Information Security

The Graduate Diploma in Information Security is an 18 credit program is entirely coursework. Any coursework taken or diploma received will count towards the Master of Information Systems Security Management (MISSM) should the student or graduate apply to the MISSM program at a later date. Note that holders of the Master of Information Systems Assurance Management (MISAM) degree may not apply for the MISSM degree; however they may receive the Graduate Diploma in Information Security.

A. Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are:

  1. Four-year Bachelor degree from a recognized educational institution, preferably in business/management, engineering, management of information systems or computing science. Students entering the program require a minimum GPA of 3.0 or equivalent in the last 60 credits of undergraduate study;
  2. A GPA of 3.0 on a general Network Technology course and an Operating Systems course or equivalent knowledge;
  3. A security clearance;
  4. Demonstrated fulfilment of Concordia University of Edmonton’s English Language Requirement.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 18 credits required, to include:
    1. ISSM 521
    2. ISSM 525
    3. ISSM 533
    4. ISSM 536
    5. ISSM 551
    6. 3 credits chosen from ISSM 531 or 535
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the required courses.
  3. must complete 12 of 18 credits at Concordia University of Edmonton.
  4. complete program within 6 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.4.4 Graduate Diploma in Psychological Assessment

These post-BA programs are meant to meet the needs of students and practicing psychologists to enhance their knowledge and skills in assessment. For post-BA students, the program is intended to offer professional preparation to provide skilled assessment services under the supervision of a registered psychologist (e.g., as a psychological assistant). For registered psychologists, the courses are intended to allow students to incorporate specific domains of psychological knowledge and assessment skills into their professional practice.

A. Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission, post-BA students (including those with graduate degrees) who are not registered psychologists must be prepared to present the following minimum requirements:

  1. A four-year Bachelor degree from a recognized educational institution, preferably in psychology. Note: Students with a 4-year degree in a related field may be admissible but may be required to take qualifying courses.
  2. A 3.0 GPA including the last 60 credits taken, as indicated by an official transcript.
  3. A security clearance.
  4. An academic/employment CV with a statement of career objectives.
  5. Applicants who have completed their most recent degree in a language other than English require an overall score of 98, and the following minimum scores, on each component of the TOEFL-iBT: 27 in Speaking, 25 in Writing, 23 in Listening, and 23 in Reading.

Registered psychologists will be required to provide:

  1. Proof of registration in good standing with the College of Alberta Psychologists or equivalent licensing body for psychologists.
  2. An academic/employment CV with a statement of career objectives.
  3. Applicants who have completed their most recent degree in a language other than English require an overall score of 98, and the following minimum scores, on each component of the TOEFL-iBT: 27 in Speaking, 25 in Writing, 23 in Listening, and 23 in Reading.
  4. A 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits taken, as indicated by an official transcript.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 18 credits required, to include:
    1. 12 credits chosen from PSY 634, 635, 636, 637, 652, 653, 659, 669, 677, or 678
    2. 6 credits chosen from PSY 605, 611, 621, 631, or 633
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the required courses.

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.5 Graduate Certificate Programs

Graduate Certificate programs provide students with the opportunity to study graduate-level course work without committing to a graduate degree. These programs recognize specialized education in a particular discipline and may ladder to a graduate diploma or a graduate degree. The minimum admission requirement is a baccalaureate degree or equivalent combination of education and experience (some programs may require a graduate degree), and students are required to complete a minimum of 9 credits of graduate-level course work.

13.5.1 Graduate Certificate in Psychological Assessment

These post-BA programs are meant to meet the needs of students and practicing psychologists to enhance their knowledge and skills in assessment. For post-BA students, the program is intended to offer professional preparation to provide skilled assessment services under the supervision of a registered psychologist (e.g., as a psychological assistant). For registered psychologists, the courses are intended to allow students to incorporate specific domains of psychological knowledge and assessment skills into their professional practice.

A. Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission, post-BA students (including those with graduate degrees) who are not registered psychologists must be prepared to present the following minimum requirements:

  1. A four-year Bachelor degree from a recognized educational institution, preferably in psychology. Note: Students with a 4-year degree in a related field may be admissible but may be required to take qualifying courses.
  2. A 3.0 GPA including the last 60 credits taken, as indicated by an official transcript.
  3. A security clearance.
  4. An academic/employment CV with a statement of career objectives.
  5. Applicants who have completed their most recent degree in a language other than English require an overall score of 98, and the following minimum scores, on each component of the TOEFL-iBT: 27 in Speaking, 25 in Writing, 23 in Listening, and 23 in Reading.

Registered psychologists will be required to provide:

  1. Proof of registration in good standing with the College of Alberta Psychologists or equivalent licensing body for psychologists.
  2. An academic/employment CV with a statement of career objectives.
  3. . Applicants who have completed their most recent degree in a language other than English require an overall score of 98, and the following minimum scores, on each component of the TOEFL-iBT: 27 in Speaking, 25 in Writing, 23 in Listening, and 23 in Reading.
  4. A 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits taken, as indicated by an official transcript.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 9 credits required, to include:
    1. 6 credits chosen from PSY 634, 635, 636, 637, 652, 653, 659, 669, 677, or 678
    2. 3 credits chosen from PSY 605, 611, 621, 631 or 633
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the required courses.

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.5.2 Graduate Certificate in Public Health Leadership

Leadership is recognized as a growing need in public health. The multidisciplinary nature of both health policy and health management presents both challenges and opportunities. The core disciplines include human resource management, public finances, health policy, law, organizational and personal ethics, and organization studies as applied to health care. The goal is to address problems relevant to health policy, health services delivery, outcome measurement, patient safety, leadership, and organizational management relevant to health care organizations and systems.

A. Admission Requirements

A four-year baccalaureate degree from a recognized educational institution (in a field such as environmental health, nursing, or related health sciences) or equivalent combination of education and experience and have a 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits of post-secondary education. A professional resume is also required.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 9 credits required, to include:
    1. PHLD 600
    2. PHLD 602
    3. PHLD 605
    4. PHLD 610
    5. PHLD 612
    6. PHLD 615
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 in the required courses.
  3. complete program within 3 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, seeGraduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.5.3 Graduate Certificate in Public Health Strategic Communication

Health communication has been defined as “the main currency of healthcare in the 21st century”(Clancy quoted in Krisberg, 2004). Health Communication is a multidisciplinary field with the objective to share public health information to multiple audiences. The goals of public health communication is to influence, engage, and support individuals, communities, health professionals, special groups, policy makers, and the public to champion, introduce, adopt, or sustain a behaviour, practice, or policy that will ultimately improve health outcomes. The diversity of the audience for public health information necessitates that public health professionals be sensitive to the public’s needs, cultural practices, and environments where they work and live. Additionally, the public health professional must take into account the best research evidence and translate (communicate) this evidence into action.

A. Admission Requirements

A four-year baccalaureate degree from a recognized educational institution (in a field such as environmental health, nursing, or related health sciences) or equivalent combination of education and experience and have a 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits of post-secondary education. A professional resume is also required.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 9 credits required, to include:
    1. PHSC 620
    2. PHSC 621
    3. PHSC 623
    4. PHSC 624
    5. PHSC 627
    6. PHSC 628
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 in the required courses
  3. complete program within 3 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

13.5.4 Graduate Certificate in Public Health For Vulnerable Populations

In Canada, the importance of reducing health disparities has emerged as an imperative for health policy makers and public health practitioners. Over the next ten years, jurisdictions across Canada will see rising rates of chronic preventable diseases such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, tobacco-related illnesses, and environmental illnesses. These problems are, and will continue to be, particularly acute in specific vulnerable populations.

A. Admission Requirements

A four-year baccalaureate degree from a recognized educational institution (in a field such as environmental health, nursing, or related health sciences) or equivalent combination of education and experience and have a 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits of post-secondary education. A professional resume is also required.

B. Program Requirements

  1. 9 credits required, to include:
    1. PHVP 630
    2. PHVP 631
    3. PHVP 634
    4. PHVP 635
    5. PHVP 637
    6. PHVP 638
  2. achieve a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 in the required courses.
  3. complete program within 3 years

C. Graduation Requirements

Students graduate on one of three degree-conferral dates following successful completion of their program requirements. For further information about graduation requirements, see Graduation and Convocation, section 13.0.2.E.

1. Regular Graduate Students
are students who, having met all the admission requirements, are registered in a faculty-approved graduate program at Concordia University of Edmonton.
2. Qualifying Graduate Student
meet the admission requirements for a graduate program but lack the background in a chosen area of specialization to pursue graduate studies in that area. Qualifying graduate students are registered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies but are not candidates for a degree/diploma/certificate.
During the qualifying period, which normally should not exceed one year or five full-course equivalents, students are required to complete courses specified by the department concerned.
In addition to the required courses, the student may be permitted to take one or more graduate courses with the permission of the MPC. Upon the student’s satisfactory completion of qualifying work, the department may recommend that the student be reclassified as one of the following: (a) probationary graduate student or (b) regular graduate student. This reclassification is not automatic and is dependent on the student’s academic performance.
Qualifying graduate students are required to pay the tuition fees for all courses taken during the qualifying period. Neither the non-program courses taken nor the fees paid during the qualifying period may be credited toward a subsequent degree/diploma/certificate program.
3. Probationary Graduate Students
are those whose academic record is either (a) difficult to assess, as may be the case of students from foreign universities, or (b) below the academic standard required by a department.
A probationary graduate student is admitted under the following conditions:

  1. In the first one-semester term in which the probationary graduate student registers, he or she must take the courses and workload specified by the department at the time of admission.
  2. The probationary graduate student must meet all probationary conditions and achieve the minimum grades established by the department.
  3. The probationary conditions will be clearly stated in the student’s admission letter, followed by the statement that if the student fails to satisfy the stated conditions, the student may not be allowed to continue in the program.

After the first term of probationary registration, the following regulations apply:

Any student who fails to meet the conditions of a second probationary registration may not continue in the program.

Probationary graduate students are not considered to be candidates for a degree/diploma/certificate.

  1. Full-time Students: If the full-time probationary graduate student satisfies all of the probationary conditions of admission, the department recommends that the student be accepted as a regular graduate student. All graduate courses successfully completed during the probationary term may be credited toward the student’s graduate degree/diploma/certificate.
  2. Part-time Students: If the part-time probationary graduate student meets all of the probationary conditions in the first term, the department may recommend a second term of probationary registration and shall specify the conditions of that registration.
  3. If a student fails to meet all of the conditions of admission as a probationary graduate student, the department recommends one of the following to the Faculty of Graduate Studies:
    1. that the student be allowed to register for a second one-semester term as a probationary graduate student. This written recommendation to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must include the following: (a) an indication of how an Incomplete or Failure in a course will be managed and (b) a specification of the minimum number of graduate courses that are to be taken by the student.
    2. that the student may be permitted to register as a qualifying student provided that he or she has not already been admitted as a qualifying student.
    3. that the student not be permitted further registrations in the program. This written recommendation to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must include a rationale for the decision.
4. Special Graduate Students
are those who take graduate courses without proceeding to a graduate degree/diploma/certificate at Concordia University of Edmonton. They must meet the general admission requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. However, with the consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies and the appropriate Director, students may be admitted as special graduate students for graduate certificate courses even though they do not meet general requirements for Graduate Studies.
A special graduate student is not a candidate for a degree/diploma/certificate at Concordia University of Edmonton and will not receive any residence or fee credit toward a subsequent degree/diploma/certificate program at Concordia University of Edmonton for work completed as a special graduate student.
Admission as a special graduate student does not imply eligibility for admission to a degree/diploma/certificate program in any department. Individuals who wish to study under this classification must apply and be admitted each year in which they take courses.
Special graduate students require written permission from the department concerned to register in a course.
Probationary status as a special graduate student may be granted on an individual basis.
5. Visiting Graduate Students
are those who are registered at another university that does not have an exchange agreement with Concordia University of Edmonton. Students must obtain written permission from their host institution and from Concordia University of Edmonton to take one or more courses for transfer credit toward the graduate degree program at their home institution.
Level 1:
Within fifteen (15) days of the Registrar’s Office posting grades online, the student shall document his or her concerns in writing and discuss them with the instructor. Such reappraisal shall involve a review of the course requirements, together with a check of the computation of weighted components used in calculating the final grade. The instructor will inform the student of changes, if any, in writing as soon as possible.
Level 2:
If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of the appeal to the instructor because the student believes some injustice has been done, or has substantial new evidence that could not be presented to the instructor, he or she shall inform the Registrar’s Office, in writing, within seven (7) days of the notification of the decision by the instructor. The letter must include the decision that is being appealed, the grounds for appeal, and the remedy sought by the appellant. If all three are not specified in the appeal letter, or if the Chair of the student’s Master’s Program Committee decides that sufficient grounds do not exist, the appeal will not be heard. Reappraisals are dealt with by the Chair of the Master’s Program Committee in consultation with the instructor and one other faculty member in the student’s program. Such reappraisal of grades shall again involve a review of the course requirements, together with a check of the computation of weighted components used in calculating the final grade. The Registrar’s Office shall inform the student in writing of the result of the reappraisal.